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After we had recovered from the stress in Wellington, we came to the conclusion that rushing through the rest of the country and the rest of our time for some Last-Minute-Sightseeing Japanese style might not be the best idea. You guys apparently had the impression we have reached the point where we are exhausted and are looking forward to the end of our time here.. that left us wondering how this impression arose as we do enjoy our time here and there are still so many things we wanted to do. I think we got stuck in the limbo between excessive desire for action and a state of being shell-shocked because of the time that is constantly and mercilessly flying by. Plus wintertime seems to knock on New Zealand’s doors as well (hardly to believe with more than 20°C here up north) but not only the rain is increasing but also the storm hazards. We find ourselves more and more sitting on couches with a hot cup of tea rather than tramping or doing something outside… it’s just not as much fun in the rain.

Well, so we had no other choice than generously but with a heavy heart crossing out most of the points on our mental to-do-list and shorten it to three: Rotorua, Coromandel and Northlands. The 5 day hike around Lake Waikaremoana, the first daylight on (almost) the entire world at the East Coast, Napier, the White Island, Whakatane… all these things we had to move to the “When-we-come-back-to-NZ-To-Do-List” because the distances to the places are just too big and/or they would have taken us too long. (Quote Chris when he read my text: “It is absolutely heart-braking to think of how many things we are going to miss out!”)

After we left Taranaki, we reached our first destination Rotorua – a town directly on the Pacific Ring of Fire. Rotorua is a geothermal area: Geysers, bubbling-boiling mud pools, encrusted minerals on Sinter terraces and geothermal spa baths in public buildings, hotels and hostels make this unique place one of the main tourist attractions of the North Island. The unmistakable smell of the hydrogen sulphide which resembles the smell of rotten eggs is for free (but is fortunately hardly noticeable after a few hours in town). In Rotorua tourists also get the chance of participating in a Hangi – a traditional Maori meal which is cooked underground in an earth oven. Before dinner one gets a shallow but entertaining Maori-Culture- Show where the tourists can marvel at the impressive war canoe, learn something about the tattoos, grimaces and weapons and let themselves be entertained by some Maori songs and – dances like the Haka, the traditional war dance also the All Blacks, New Zealand’s Rugby Team, perform before every game in order to intimidate the opposing team.


Hangi



Waka – traditional Maori-Canoe



Waka – traditional Maori-Canoe















All Blacks Haka – Adidas Commercial



Geothermal park Wai – O – Tapu



Geothermal park Wai – O – Tapu, „The Devil’s Ink Pots“



Geothermal park Wai – O – Tapu



Geothermal park Wai – O – Tapu, „Artist’s Palette“



Geothermal park Wai – O – Tapu, „Champagne Pool“



Geothermal park Wai – O – Tapu, „Devil’s Bath“



bubbling mud pools near Wai – O – Tapu



bubbling mud pools near Wai – O – Tapu



bubbling mud pools near Wai – O – Tapu



sitting in the hot river Kerosene Creek, near Rotorua

We spent the weekend in Paeroa at Dennis’ place, Chris’ friend from former university times. Here we were welcomed warmly in the community of Paeroa – in his circle of friends as well as his rugby club, the “Paeroa Old Boys“. We finished our weekend with an exploring tour through old gold mining tunnels in Karangahake Gorge.



Dennis at the Rugby game of Paeroa’s „Old Boys“ vs. Waihi



Dennis at the Rugby game of Paeroa’s „Old Boys“ vs. Waihi















With a detour over the Coromandel Peninsula we go back to Auckland so we could organise a few things for our trip to Indonesia. We needed a stop somewhere along the way to Northlands anyway so this wet day is a perfect opportunity. Claire, the nice lady from the reception of our favourite hostel in Auckland, even recognized my voice and my name when I called (after more than 3 months!) and was friendly and helpful as ever when we checked in: “Oh great! I so hoped it was you guys I had in mind when we talked earlier. I gave you my favourite room! *beam*” With a smile we get into the luxurious 3-bed-room with its own bathroom and heavenly mattresses which is supposed to be a share room for tonight. But no one else turned up so we have it all to ourselves. With so much friendliness and hospitality it will be a very hard farewell from this country. 10 days to go.



Cathedral Cove, Hahei, Coromandel Peninsula.



Incredibly skillful translators at work. I’m still wandering what a „warningrock-fall-danger-area“ might be. Sorry, I guess it’s funnier in German.



Cathedral Cove, Hahei, Coromandel Peninsula.



Hahei, Coromandel Peninsula.



Hahei, Coromandel Peninsula


Somewhere along the way between Coromandel Town and Colville, Coromandel Peninsula



enjoying the sunset somewhere along the way between Coromandel Town and Colville, Coromandel Peninsula



Somewhere along the way between Coromandel Town and Colville, Coromandel Peninsula



Somewhere along the way between Coromandel Town and Colville, Coromandel Peninsula



The settlers of New Zealand took all the liberties they wanted when it came to naming all the places. After the town Stratford which was obviously named after Shakespeare’s birthplace as all the streets carry the names of his drama characters, here we have an obeisance of a different kind :o)

1 Kommentar auf “Between coastlines and the Pacific Ring of Fire”

  1. Helga sagt:

    Mmmmmm…war Hangi lecker?????sieht SEHR lecker aus…..:-)also,schade das die Zeit in Neuseeland fast vorbei ist :-(..aber nicht sooo traurig sein so viele schöne Eindrücke bleiben Euch immer erhalten und wie Ihr schon schreibt…es gibt ein Wiedersehen…..:-) mit Neuseeland….also ich knuddel Euch aus der Ferne